Books

Selected Title

0385671466

The Nhl: 100 Years Of On-ice Action And Boardroom Battles

The National Hockey League — born in a Montreal hotel room on November 26, 1917 — has much to celebrate as it approaches its centenary. Millions of fans from Montreal to Miami and Edmonton to Anaheim attend NHL games leach year, millions more watch on TV and the league pays its best players multi-million annual salaries.
Over the course of its first century, the NHL’s fortunes have ebbed and flowed. It has experienced setbacks and triumphs and innumerable crises. The league has awarded many franchises only to see some of them falter, fail and fold. The board of governors – which has included rich eccentrics and at least one future convict – has sometimes been fractured by men who loathed each other. How on earth has the NHL survived? The answer lies in the remarkable fact that it has had only five presidents and one commissioner. Two of these chiefs were stop-gaps. For the balance of league’s ninety-plus years, four men have shaped and guided its fortunes and controlled the tough, hard-nosed, sometimes unruly owners who constituted the board of governors.
This is the story of two perpetual struggles — the one on the ice and the one going on behind the scenes to keep the whole enterprise afloat. D’Arcy Jenish was granted unprecedented access to previously unpublished league files, including revelatory minutes of board meetings, and conducted dozens of hours of interviews with league executives, including commissioner Gary Bettman and former president John Ziegler, as well as well as owners, coaches, general managers and player representatives. He now reveals for the first time the true story behind some of the most significant events of the contemporary era.
This is a definitive, revelatory chonicle that no serious hockey fan will want to be without.

stanleycup-114x150The Stanley Cup

100 Years of hockey at its best

Professional hockey’s ultimate spectacle occurs in early June each year when a single player, surrounded by jubilant teammates, stands at centre ice in a packed and tumultuous arena, and hoists the Stanley Cup toward the heavens. This ritual, deeply engrained in the Canadian psyche has become one of the most concise, compelling and powerful images of victory in all of sport…This gesture is ancient in origin and primitive in nature. Every player who holds the Cup above his head is responding to the same impulse that has seized the conquering warrior from time immemorial. It is the urge to stand on the hilltop or the rooftop and show tangible proof of triumph.

So begins D’Arcy Jenish’s comprehensive and insightful history of the first century of Stanley Cup competition. Based on contemporary newspaper accounts and interviews with over 60 players, coaches and managers, it is a vivid account of what happened on the ice and in the stands. Indeed, readers and reviewers alike were captivated by the author’s depiction of crowded, smoke-filled arenas and the passions generated by the battles for hockey’s ultimate prize.

The crowds of the 1890s and early 20th century were every bit as loud and boisterous as contemporary crowds. When their team won, they frequently carried the players off the ice or through the streets. They gave the players rousing send offs at railway stations when they were leaving for a Stanley Cup series. Mobs of jubilant fans would greet a team that returned with the Cup.

Canadians have always been willing to pay exorbitant prices to see a Stanley Cup game. In December, 1896, for example, a Winnipeg man traded 2 1/2 tons of coal for a $2 ticket.

Today, every arena has an official seating capacity that is strictly enforced. In the early days, the teams frequently sold more tickets than their buildings could seat and the police sometimes had to cut off sales. The overflow fans filled the aisles, stood five to six deep in the standing room sections or sat in the rafters.

Gambling has more or less disappeared from the hockey scene, but in the early years fans and players frequently wagered thousands of dollars on the outcomes. In March 1907, the Kenora Thistles and Montreal Wanderers played a Stanley Cup series in Winnipeg. The arena was packed for the opening game, the crowd was cheering wildly and, according to one newspaper account: “There was heavy betting all over the rink. Big bets were placed in the dressing rooms before the game.”

Throughout this engrossing history, Jenish charts the rise and fall of hockey’s great dynasties such as the original Ottawa Senators, the Montreal Canadiens, the Toronto Maple Leafs and the Edmonton Oilers. And he documents the incredible feats of the game’s greatest players from Frank McGee to Rocket Richard to Mario Lemieux.

Second Opinions

“Any journalist who reads this book will be impressed by the depth of the research Jenish has obviously done. He has turned up new anecdotes in exploring what had been considered familiar territory.” – Jim Proudfoot, Toronto Star.

“Though many books have been written on the Stanley Cup, Jenish’s effort is a gold mine of new material…” – David Staples, Edmonton Journal.

“Jenish keeps it simple, but riveting with first-rate research, quoting liberally from the lavish sports writing of the times and interviews with parties who have witnessed some of hockey’s most dramatic challenges for the Cup.” – John Kernaghan, Hamilton Spectator.

moneytoburn-114x150Money To Burn

Trudeau, Mulroney & the Bankruptcy of Canada

On January 12, 1995, while D’Arcy Jenish was hard at work on this book, the Wall Street Journal ran an editorial entitled “Bankrupt Canada?” and then proceeded to answer that question in no uncertain terms. “Mexico isn’t the only U.S. neighbor flirting with the financial abyss,” the Journal declared. “Turn around and check out Canada, which has now become an honorary member of the Third World in the unmanageability of its debt problem.”

At that point in time, after 30 straight years of steadily mounting federal deficits, Ottawa had piled up $600 billion in debt and interest charges were consuming $40 billion a year. Money To Burn is a clear, straightforward, easy-to-understand account of how successive governments under Pierre Trudeau and Brian Mulroney let government growth and public spending spiral out of control–and came close to bankrupting one of the most prosperous and fortunate countries on earth.

Second Opinions

“Extremely well written and a pleasure to read…As an explanation of how the leaders failed the Canadian people and the consequences of that failure, the book is first rate…A must read for anyone who thinks that public debt doesn’t matter and that current governments don’t have to do anything about it.” – Prof. James Gillies, Shulich School of Business, York University.

indianfall-114x150Indian Fall

The Last Great Days of the Plains Cree and the Blackfoot Confederacy

The 19th century was time of turmoil, trauma and conflict in the Canadian West. Cree, Blackfoot and other original inhabitants were being pushed aside by newcomers. Wars, famines and plagues; treaties, trials, refugees and hangings were all part of the swirl of events that brought an end to ancient ways of living and allowed a new order to rise.

Indian Fall is an arresting account of this epochal conflict, told through the lives of four heroic native leaders: Piapot; Big Bear; Crowfoot and Poundmaker. Their way of life allowed them to draw strength from the elements, knowledge from the land and wisdom from their dreams. Their culture was based on motion and mobility, homes that were light and portable, villages that flowed with the seasons and the herds of buffalo.

These men and their peoples were up against an alien and incomprehensible civilization that strove for permanence, erected fences and fixed structures, built roads and railways, and adhered to clocks and calendars. The times denied Piapot, Big Bear, Crowfoot and Poundmaker rousing victories and personal glory. They relied on unshakeable courage and integrity to deal with circumstances that fate and dealt. They were heroes to their followers and rightly so for they were remarkable leaders.

Second Opinions

” Move over, Sitting Bull and Geronimo, Indian Fall brings alive some of the most fascinating characters in Canada’s past–warts, halos and all.” – David Cruise and Allison Griffiths, authors of The Great Adventure

“Mr. Jenish’s Cree and Blackfoot, Stoneys and Sioux ride through his account in all their ferocious, generous and arrogant glory.” – Link Byfield in Alberta Report magazine.

Awards

Indian Fall won the Canadian Authors Association Lela Common Award for Canadian History in June 2000.

epicwandererEpic Wanderer

David Thompson and the Mapping of the Canadian West

The first full length biography of the fir trader, explorer, mapmaker David Thompson, one of the most remarkable characters in the early history of North America.

David Thompson was born in London in 1770 and died near Montreal in 1857. He arrived in Canada in 1784 and spent 28 year roaming lands known as the Great Northwest. Lands bounded by Hudson Bay, Lake Superior, the upper Missouri River and extending all the way to the Pacific.

All those vast, uncharted resource rich lands were then the domain of the Indian–Chipewyan, Cree, Ojibway, Mandan, Blackfoot, Kootenae, Salish and many lesser nations. Rival fur trading companies coveted these lands and contended for control of them and rival nations–Britain, America and Russia–sought to claim as much of the Great Northwest as possible.

Thompson rose to prominence in this world. He began as a boy of 14 on the bleak, lonely coast of Hudson Bay. He became a man of many parts: fur trader, explorer, astronomer, surveyor and mapmaker. He could build a house or a canoe. He could mend his clothes, repair his guns and he had a knack for learning languages. His first was English, his second Cree, his third Blackfoot and his flourth an exquisitely accented French.

Thompson acquired another set of skills that distinguished him from his peers. He mastered the complex science of celestial navigation. He could determine his precise position in degrees of latitude and longitude by studying positions and motion of certain celestial bodies. Everywhere he travelled, Thompson observed for latitude and longitude and he later used his observations to create map that depicted the entire Northwest–from Hudson Bay to the Pacific.
Despite his extraordinary accomplishments, Thompson did not achieve the renown of many of his peers and died poor, blind and obscure.

Second Opinions

“Epic Wanderer is a gripping yarn about one man’s ambitions, his breathtaking adventures and the opening of the West. It’s well researched and it’s heartfelt.” – Ottawa Citizen

“In Epic Wanderer, D’Arcy Jenish remains admirably invisible and allows the remarkable life of his subject speak for itself…It is replete with fascinating detail…” – Quill and Quire

Awards

Epic Wanderer won the 2004 University of British Columbia Medal for Biography–a prestigious award bestowed on many of Canada’s best writers.

motrealeng

The Montreal Canadians

100 years of glory.

When we think of the Montreal Canadiens, we think of many things, some obvious, some less so. We think of the Stanley Cup; the great players like Georges Vezina, Howie Morenz, the Rocket and Guy Lafleur; the stern, but winning coaches–Scotty Bowman, Toe Blake, Dick Irvin; the shrewd general managers Sam Pollock and Frank Selke; owners that spanned the spectrum from aristocratic to flamboyant and the most ardent fans in the sport of hockey.

They’re all here in this kaleidoscopic narrative that was a national bestseller. It weaves together the personalities, the setbacks, the crises and the triumphs that have made the Montreal Canadiens one of the most compelling stories in the world of professional sport.

Second Opinions

D’Arcy Jenish has sanded and scraped away the layers of time. He has resisted the fluffy, romantic versions which have become common and delivered us the nitty-gritty, real-deal story–the good and the not so good. I can tell you this because I know.” – From the introduction by Bob Gainey.

“I look forward to a quiet moment when I might delve into your interesting volume, which will make a welcome addition to my personal library.” – Prime Minister Stephen Harper in a letter to the author.

montrealfre-114x150The Montreal Canadians

100 years of glory. – French Version

When we think of the Montreal Canadiens, we think of many things, some obvious, some less so. We think of the Stanley Cup; the great players like Georges Vezina, Howie Morenz, the Rocket and Guy Lafleur; the stern, but winning coaches–Scotty Bowman, Toe Blake, Dick Irvin; the shrewd general managers Sam Pollock and Frank Selke; owners that spanned the spectrum from aristocratic to flamboyant and the most ardent fans in the sport of hockey.

They’re all here in this kaleidoscopic narrative that was a national bestseller. It weaves together the personalities, the setbacks, the crises and the triumphs that have made the Montreal Canadiens one of the most compelling stories in the world of professional sport.

Second Opinions

D’Arcy Jenish has sanded and scraped away the layers of time. He has resisted the fluffy, romantic versions which have become common and delivered us the nitty-gritty, real-deal story–the good and the not so good. I can tell you this because I know.” – From the introduction by Bob Gainey.

“I look forward to a quiet moment when I might delve into your interesting volume, which will make a welcome addition to my personal library.” – Prime Minister Stephen Harper in a letter to the author.

trialsTrials & Triumphs

The Remarkable Story Canada’s Generic Pharmaceutical Industry

Shortly after the end of World War Two, a few mavericks, visionaries and contrarians began small-scale manufacturing of generic pharmaceuticals in Torontoand Montreal. Despite working in an unfavourable regulatory environment and an industry dominated by powerful, multinational drug companies, they survived and flourished. By the turn of the century, some of these small-scale Canadian operations had grown to become large corporations. They were competing successfully on the world stage. They were selling hundreds of products in dozens of countries. As well, German and Israeli manufacturers had acquired some of the leading Canadian companies. Trials and Triumphs is an official history that was commissioned by the Canadian Generic Pharmaceutical Association. It recounts the birth, growth and startling success of an industry that makes a vital contribution to the country’s economy and its universal health care system.

stlawerence-114x150The St. Lawrence Seaway

50 years and counting

The opening of the St. Lawrence Seaway in the spring of 1959 was a momentous occasion. This system of locks, canal, shipping channels and bridges between Montreal and the Ontario riverside town of Iroquois, 150 kilometres to the west, was one of the greatest ;public works in Canadian history and one of the largest construction projects in the postwar era. Built in four years, at a cost of $475 million, the Seaway completely transformed the marine transportation industry in Canada. It allowed ocean-going vessels to sail 3,680 kilometres inland, from the Gulf of St. Lawrence to Lake Ontario, through the previously constructed Welland Canal, and from there all the way to Thunder Bay, Ont. or Duluth, Minn.

Deckhands lower a gangplank, and two smartly dressed officers disembark. Captain Mark Dillon and Chief Engineer Christian Pelletier are wearing navy blue suits with crisp white shirts and neatly knotted, matching blue ties. The St. Lambert Lock is the gateway to the Great Lakes St. Lawrence Seaway a system of canals, shipping channels and locks that allows ships to sail 3,700 kilometres inland from the Atlantic Ocean to the head of Lake Superior and the Spruceglen is the first vessel to enter the waterway in its 50th-anniversary season.

When the Seaway was officially opened on June 26, 1959, Queen Elizabeth called it “one of the outstanding engineering accomplishments of modern times,” while U.S. President Dwight Eisenhower declared it “a magnificent symbol to the world of the achievements possible to democratic nations peacefully working together for the common good.”

This book is an official history. It was commissioned by the board of directors of the St. Lawrence Seaway Management Commission to commemorate the 50th anniversary. It provides a snapshot of the history of the Seaway, the waterway as it is today and its future prospects. The book is available in English and French.

canadaonice-114x150

Canada On Ice

50 years of great hockey.

Hockey is a vibrant touchstone of Canadian life. The game has been the source of some of the country’s greatest triumphs and produced some of our greatest heroes. For more than half a century, Maclean’s magazine charted hockey’s coming of age–both on and off the ice–with some of the finest sports journalists in the country. Trent Frayne, Peter Gzowski and Roy MacGregor are but a few of the writers who have chronicled the nation’s hockey dreams with the magazine’s pages and their work is well represented in this handsome volume. It includes in-depth and insightful profiles of the Rocket, Gordie Howe, Bobby Orr, Wayne Gretzky and many more.

trialsTrials & Triumphs

The Remarkable Story Canada’s Generic Pharmaceutical Industry

Shortly after the end of World War Two, a few mavericks, visionaries and contrarians began small-scale manufacturing of generic pharmaceuticals in Torontoand Montreal. Despite working in an unfavourable regulatory environment and an industry dominated by powerful, multinational drug companies, they survived and flourished. By the turn of the century, some of these small-scale Canadian operations had grown to become large corporations. They were competing successfully on the world stage. They were selling hundreds of products in dozens of countries. As well, German and Israeli manufacturers had acquired some of the leading Canadian companies. Trials and Triumphs is an official history that was commissioned by the Canadian Generic Pharmaceutical Association. It recounts the birth, growth and startling success of an industry that makes a vital contribution to the country’s economy and its universal health care system.

stlawerence-114x150The St. Lawrence Seaway

50 years and counting

The opening of the St. Lawrence Seaway in the spring of 1959 was a momentous occasion. This system of locks, canal, shipping channels and bridges between Montreal and the Ontario riverside town of Iroquois, 150 kilometres to the west, was one of the greatest ;public works in Canadian history and one of the largest construction projects in the postwar era. Built in four years, at a cost of $475 million, the Seaway completely transformed the marine transportation industry in Canada. It allowed ocean-going vessels to sail 3,680 kilometres inland, from the Gulf of St. Lawrence to Lake Ontario, through the previously constructed Welland Canal, and from there all the way to Thunder Bay, Ont. or Duluth, Minn.

Deckhands lower a gangplank, and two smartly dressed officers disembark. Captain Mark Dillon and Chief Engineer Christian Pelletier are wearing navy blue suits with crisp white shirts and neatly knotted, matching blue ties. The St. Lambert Lock is the gateway to the Great Lakes St. Lawrence Seaway a system of canals, shipping channels and locks that allows ships to sail 3,700 kilometres inland from the Atlantic Ocean to the head of Lake Superior and the Spruceglen is the first vessel to enter the waterway in its 50th-anniversary season.

When the Seaway was officially opened on June 26, 1959, Queen Elizabeth called it “one of the outstanding engineering accomplishments of modern times,” while U.S. President Dwight Eisenhower declared it “a magnificent symbol to the world of the achievements possible to democratic nations peacefully working together for the common good.”

This book is an official history. It was commissioned by the board of directors of the St. Lawrence Seaway Management Commission to commemorate the 50th anniversary. It provides a snapshot of the history of the Seaway, the waterway as it is today and its future prospects. The book is available in English and French.

0385671466

The Nhl: 100 Years Of On-ice Action And Boardroom Battles

The National Hockey League — born in a Montreal hotel room on November 26, 1917 — has much to celebrate as it approaches its centenary. Millions of fans from Montreal to Miami and Edmonton to Anaheim attend NHL games leach year, millions more watch on TV and the league pays its best players multi-million annual salaries.
Over the course of its first century, the NHL’s fortunes have ebbed and flowed. It has experienced setbacks and triumphs and innumerable crises. The league has awarded many franchises only to see some of them falter, fail and fold. The board of governors – which has included rich eccentrics and at least one future convict – has sometimes been fractured by men who loathed each other. How on earth has the NHL survived? The answer lies in the remarkable fact that it has had only five presidents and one commissioner. Two of these chiefs were stop-gaps. For the balance of league’s ninety-plus years, four men have shaped and guided its fortunes and controlled the tough, hard-nosed, sometimes unruly owners who constituted the board of governors.
This is the story of two perpetual struggles — the one on the ice and the one going on behind the scenes to keep the whole enterprise afloat. D’Arcy Jenish was granted unprecedented access to previously unpublished league files, including revelatory minutes of board meetings, and conducted dozens of hours of interviews with league executives, including commissioner Gary Bettman and former president John Ziegler, as well as well as owners, coaches, general managers and player representatives. He now reveals for the first time the true story behind some of the most significant events of the contemporary era.
This is a definitive, revelatory chonicle that no serious hockey fan will want to be without.

stanleycup-114x150The Stanley Cup

100 Years of hockey at its best

Professional hockey’s ultimate spectacle occurs in early June each year when a single player, surrounded by jubilant teammates, stands at centre ice in a packed and tumultuous arena, and hoists the Stanley Cup toward the heavens. This ritual, deeply engrained in the Canadian psyche has become one of the most concise, compelling and powerful images of victory in all of sport…This gesture is ancient in origin and primitive in nature. Every player who holds the Cup above his head is responding to the same impulse that has seized the conquering warrior from time immemorial. It is the urge to stand on the hilltop or the rooftop and show tangible proof of triumph.

So begins D’Arcy Jenish’s comprehensive and insightful history of the first century of Stanley Cup competition. Based on contemporary newspaper accounts and interviews with over 60 players, coaches and managers, it is a vivid account of what happened on the ice and in the stands. Indeed, readers and reviewers alike were captivated by the author’s depiction of crowded, smoke-filled arenas and the passions generated by the battles for hockey’s ultimate prize.

The crowds of the 1890s and early 20th century were every bit as loud and boisterous as contemporary crowds. When their team won, they frequently carried the players off the ice or through the streets. They gave the players rousing send offs at railway stations when they were leaving for a Stanley Cup series. Mobs of jubilant fans would greet a team that returned with the Cup.

Canadians have always been willing to pay exorbitant prices to see a Stanley Cup game. In December, 1896, for example, a Winnipeg man traded 2 1/2 tons of coal for a $2 ticket.

Today, every arena has an official seating capacity that is strictly enforced. In the early days, the teams frequently sold more tickets than their buildings could seat and the police sometimes had to cut off sales. The overflow fans filled the aisles, stood five to six deep in the standing room sections or sat in the rafters.

Gambling has more or less disappeared from the hockey scene, but in the early years fans and players frequently wagered thousands of dollars on the outcomes. In March 1907, the Kenora Thistles and Montreal Wanderers played a Stanley Cup series in Winnipeg. The arena was packed for the opening game, the crowd was cheering wildly and, according to one newspaper account: “There was heavy betting all over the rink. Big bets were placed in the dressing rooms before the game.”

Throughout this engrossing history, Jenish charts the rise and fall of hockey’s great dynasties such as the original Ottawa Senators, the Montreal Canadiens, the Toronto Maple Leafs and the Edmonton Oilers. And he documents the incredible feats of the game’s greatest players from Frank McGee to Rocket Richard to Mario Lemieux.

Second Opinions

“Any journalist who reads this book will be impressed by the depth of the research Jenish has obviously done. He has turned up new anecdotes in exploring what had been considered familiar territory.” – Jim Proudfoot, Toronto Star.

“Though many books have been written on the Stanley Cup, Jenish’s effort is a gold mine of new material…” – David Staples, Edmonton Journal.

“Jenish keeps it simple, but riveting with first-rate research, quoting liberally from the lavish sports writing of the times and interviews with parties who have witnessed some of hockey’s most dramatic challenges for the Cup.” – John Kernaghan, Hamilton Spectator.

moneytoburn-114x150Money To Burn

Trudeau, Mulroney & the Bankruptcy of Canada

On January 12, 1995, while D’Arcy Jenish was hard at work on this book, the Wall Street Journal ran an editorial entitled “Bankrupt Canada?” and then proceeded to answer that question in no uncertain terms. “Mexico isn’t the only U.S. neighbor flirting with the financial abyss,” the Journal declared. “Turn around and check out Canada, which has now become an honorary member of the Third World in the unmanageability of its debt problem.”

At that point in time, after 30 straight years of steadily mounting federal deficits, Ottawa had piled up $600 billion in debt and interest charges were consuming $40 billion a year. Money To Burn is a clear, straightforward, easy-to-understand account of how successive governments under Pierre Trudeau and Brian Mulroney let government growth and public spending spiral out of control–and came close to bankrupting one of the most prosperous and fortunate countries on earth.

Second Opinions

“Extremely well written and a pleasure to read…As an explanation of how the leaders failed the Canadian people and the consequences of that failure, the book is first rate…A must read for anyone who thinks that public debt doesn’t matter and that current governments don’t have to do anything about it.” – Prof. James Gillies, Shulich School of Business, York University.

indianfall-114x150Indian Fall

The Last Great Days of the Plains Cree and the Blackfoot Confederacy

The 19th century was time of turmoil, trauma and conflict in the Canadian West. Cree, Blackfoot and other original inhabitants were being pushed aside by newcomers. Wars, famines and plagues; treaties, trials, refugees and hangings were all part of the swirl of events that brought an end to ancient ways of living and allowed a new order to rise.

Indian Fall is an arresting account of this epochal conflict, told through the lives of four heroic native leaders: Piapot; Big Bear; Crowfoot and Poundmaker. Their way of life allowed them to draw strength from the elements, knowledge from the land and wisdom from their dreams. Their culture was based on motion and mobility, homes that were light and portable, villages that flowed with the seasons and the herds of buffalo.

These men and their peoples were up against an alien and incomprehensible civilization that strove for permanence, erected fences and fixed structures, built roads and railways, and adhered to clocks and calendars. The times denied Piapot, Big Bear, Crowfoot and Poundmaker rousing victories and personal glory. They relied on unshakeable courage and integrity to deal with circumstances that fate and dealt. They were heroes to their followers and rightly so for they were remarkable leaders.

Second Opinions

” Move over, Sitting Bull and Geronimo, Indian Fall brings alive some of the most fascinating characters in Canada’s past–warts, halos and all.” – David Cruise and Allison Griffiths, authors of The Great Adventure

“Mr. Jenish’s Cree and Blackfoot, Stoneys and Sioux ride through his account in all their ferocious, generous and arrogant glory.” – Link Byfield in Alberta Report magazine.

Awards

Indian Fall won the Canadian Authors Association Lela Common Award for Canadian History in June 2000.

epicwandererEpic Wanderer

David Thompson and the Mapping of the Canadian West

The first full length biography of the fir trader, explorer, mapmaker David Thompson, one of the most remarkable characters in the early history of North America.

David Thompson was born in London in 1770 and died near Montreal in 1857. He arrived in Canada in 1784 and spent 28 year roaming lands known as the Great Northwest. Lands bounded by Hudson Bay, Lake Superior, the upper Missouri River and extending all the way to the Pacific.

All those vast, uncharted resource rich lands were then the domain of the Indian–Chipewyan, Cree, Ojibway, Mandan, Blackfoot, Kootenae, Salish and many lesser nations. Rival fur trading companies coveted these lands and contended for control of them and rival nations–Britain, America and Russia–sought to claim as much of the Great Northwest as possible.

Thompson rose to prominence in this world. He began as a boy of 14 on the bleak, lonely coast of Hudson Bay. He became a man of many parts: fur trader, explorer, astronomer, surveyor and mapmaker. He could build a house or a canoe. He could mend his clothes, repair his guns and he had a knack for learning languages. His first was English, his second Cree, his third Blackfoot and his flourth an exquisitely accented French.

Thompson acquired another set of skills that distinguished him from his peers. He mastered the complex science of celestial navigation. He could determine his precise position in degrees of latitude and longitude by studying positions and motion of certain celestial bodies. Everywhere he travelled, Thompson observed for latitude and longitude and he later used his observations to create map that depicted the entire Northwest–from Hudson Bay to the Pacific.
Despite his extraordinary accomplishments, Thompson did not achieve the renown of many of his peers and died poor, blind and obscure.

Second Opinions

“Epic Wanderer is a gripping yarn about one man’s ambitions, his breathtaking adventures and the opening of the West. It’s well researched and it’s heartfelt.” – Ottawa Citizen

“In Epic Wanderer, D’Arcy Jenish remains admirably invisible and allows the remarkable life of his subject speak for itself…It is replete with fascinating detail…” – Quill and Quire

Awards

Epic Wanderer won the 2004 University of British Columbia Medal for Biography–a prestigious award bestowed on many of Canada’s best writers.

motrealeng

The Montreal Canadians

100 years of glory.

When we think of the Montreal Canadiens, we think of many things, some obvious, some less so. We think of the Stanley Cup; the great players like Georges Vezina, Howie Morenz, the Rocket and Guy Lafleur; the stern, but winning coaches–Scotty Bowman, Toe Blake, Dick Irvin; the shrewd general managers Sam Pollock and Frank Selke; owners that spanned the spectrum from aristocratic to flamboyant and the most ardent fans in the sport of hockey.

They’re all here in this kaleidoscopic narrative that was a national bestseller. It weaves together the personalities, the setbacks, the crises and the triumphs that have made the Montreal Canadiens one of the most compelling stories in the world of professional sport.

Second Opinions

D’Arcy Jenish has sanded and scraped away the layers of time. He has resisted the fluffy, romantic versions which have become common and delivered us the nitty-gritty, real-deal story–the good and the not so good. I can tell you this because I know.” – From the introduction by Bob Gainey.

“I look forward to a quiet moment when I might delve into your interesting volume, which will make a welcome addition to my personal library.” – Prime Minister Stephen Harper in a letter to the author.

montrealfre-114x150The Montreal Canadians

100 years of glory. – French Version

When we think of the Montreal Canadiens, we think of many things, some obvious, some less so. We think of the Stanley Cup; the great players like Georges Vezina, Howie Morenz, the Rocket and Guy Lafleur; the stern, but winning coaches–Scotty Bowman, Toe Blake, Dick Irvin; the shrewd general managers Sam Pollock and Frank Selke; owners that spanned the spectrum from aristocratic to flamboyant and the most ardent fans in the sport of hockey.

They’re all here in this kaleidoscopic narrative that was a national bestseller. It weaves together the personalities, the setbacks, the crises and the triumphs that have made the Montreal Canadiens one of the most compelling stories in the world of professional sport.

Second Opinions

D’Arcy Jenish has sanded and scraped away the layers of time. He has resisted the fluffy, romantic versions which have become common and delivered us the nitty-gritty, real-deal story–the good and the not so good. I can tell you this because I know.” – From the introduction by Bob Gainey.

“I look forward to a quiet moment when I might delve into your interesting volume, which will make a welcome addition to my personal library.” – Prime Minister Stephen Harper in a letter to the author.

canadaonice-114x150

Canada On Ice

50 years of great hockey.

Hockey is a vibrant touchstone of Canadian life. The game has been the source of some of the country’s greatest triumphs and produced some of our greatest heroes. For more than half a century, Maclean’s magazine charted hockey’s coming of age–both on and off the ice–with some of the finest sports journalists in the country. Trent Frayne, Peter Gzowski and Roy MacGregor are but a few of the writers who have chronicled the nation’s hockey dreams with the magazine’s pages and their work is well represented in this handsome volume. It includes in-depth and insightful profiles of the Rocket, Gordie Howe, Bobby Orr, Wayne Gretzky and many more.